caring for encaustic paintings

With proper care, your encaustic painting will last for generations. Never cover it with glass. Your painting may develop a “bloom” (a naturally-occurring hazy white look) during the first 6 to 12 months as the beeswax cures. Even fully-cured paintings will gradually become dull from exposure. Buffing the surface with a dry, soft cloth such as fleece, microfiber, or an eyeglasses cloth will remove the haze and reveal the translucent layers of wax. Never use dusting spray or any cleaner.

While encaustic paintings are surprisingly durable, the surface can get scratched, dented, or chipped. The edges are especially vulnerable. The beeswax, pigments, and damar resin and other materials in my paintings are archival and will not fade, separate, or discolor if properly handled. Do not expose encaustic paintings to direct sunlight or extreme temperatures. Between 60-120F is best.

If you need to wrap or store your painting, a sheet of ordinary waxed paper such as Cut-Rite against the surface will protect it from wrapping  materials.


Caring for oil and wax paintings

When fully dried, the surface of cold-wax and oil paintings has a matte finish. This is a characteristic of the materials and it should not be buffed or polished. If works are framed, the original surface can be left exposed. If the surface becomes dusty, use a soft lint-free cloth such as microfiber to lightly brush dust away. Never use dusting spray or cleaner. When framing works that cover edge-to-edge on boards and panels a frame spacer should be used to provide air space between the art surface and the glass. These are available at frame stores or online.

Works on oil paper are sold framed under glass to protect the paper. They may be matted if there is sufficient blank area around the image. Avoid using glass cleaner which can leak under the glass.

The beeswax, pigment, and other materials in my paintings are archival and will not fade or discolor if properly handled. However, do not expose it to direct sunlight, moisture, or extreme temperatures. 

If you need to wrap or store your exposed painting, a sheet of ordinary waxed paper such as Cut-Rite against the surface will protect it from wrapping  materials.


caring for encaustic monotypes

Monotypes are sold framed under glass to protect the delicate rice-paper surface. Select works may be framed directly beneath the glass. Most monotypes will be matted. 

The beeswax, pigment, and paper used in my monotypes are archival and will not fade or discolor. However, do not expose it to direct sunlight, moisture, or extreme temperatures. Avoid using glass cleaner which can leak under the glass.